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BACKGROUND GENEALOGY


THE GERMAN ARMY - ORGANIZATION

GERMAN ARMY ORGANIZATION

DIVISIONS OF THE GERMAN EMPIRE

Standing divisions:

Divisions raised in World War I:

http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en/1st_Guard_Infantry_Division_(Germany)


GERMAN ARMY CORPS

In 1914, the German Army's estimated strength was approximately 840,000 men from all arms of service. Yet, the mainstay of the Army Corps remained the massed infantry regiments from throughout the German Empire. Each infantry Regiment possessed three battalions, logically numbered I, II and III - with each battalion formed from four Companies, numbered one to twelve throughout the Regiment. There was also an additional Machine Gun Company but these were considered to be independent of the other companies, being of a different strength and structure. These Machine-gun Companies were numbered 1, 2 and 3 throughout the entire regiment.

The numbering of the twelve regimental companies was in addition to any title that a regiment may have and, indeed, even companies within a regiment may have. As an example of this in practice, the 6th Westphalians were also known as the 3rd Company in the 2nd Battalion of the 55th Infantry Regiment! Uniform distinctions between units in a regiment were mainly based upon the colour of their bayonet knot (see below for details). The Companies were then further divided into three Platoons ('zugen') led by a senior NCO or junior officer, numbered 1-3 and with 4 Sections ('korporalschaften') to each Platoon. These sections were commanded by a corporal and were numbered 1-12 throughout the Company. The smallest subdivision of the German Army was the 9 man Squad, including its squad leader (a lance-corporal), two of which made up the Section. This made German platoons considerably larger than their British equivalent, over twice their size. Generally speaking, the strength of Companies on wartime service was 5 officers, 259 other ranks, 10 horses and 4 wagons and they were commanded by a Captain or a Lieutenant. ....

http://www.renegademiniatures.com/article3.htm


http://www.worldwar1.com/sfgarmy.htm

http://www.worldwar1.com/sfgarmy.htm

   

Numbers Of:

   http://www.worldwar1.com/sfgermreorg.htm

After 1900, another measure was created, the Ersatz (Supplement or Reinforcement) Reserve. The Ersatz Reserve was made up of men fit for active duty, but excused for family or economic reasons, and for minor physical defects. These men were liable for Reserve service for 12 years, where they might be called up for 3 annual training sessions. In practice only a small number of these men underwent any training before 1914. Men unfit for war service were still liable for service in the Landsturm from the age of 17-45.

http://www.worldwar1.com/sfgarmy.htm


ROYAL SAXON ARMY

DRESDEN GARRISON IN 1905

Im Jahr 1905 lebten in Dresden 11.741 aktive Militärpersonen. Dresden ist Sitz verschiedener hoher Kommandostellen, Divisions-, Brigade- und anderer Stäbe. Außerdem garnisonieren in Dresden folgende Regimenter: das 1. (Leib-) Orenadier-Regiment Nr. 100, das 2. Grenadier-Regiment Nr. 101 "Kaiser Wilhelm, König von Preußen“, das Schützen- (Füsilier-) Regiment "Prinz Georg“ Nr. 108, das 12. Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 177, das 2. Jäger-Bataillon Nr. 13, das Gardereiter-Regiment, das 1. Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nr. 12. das 4. Feld-Artillerie-Regiment Nr. 48, das 1. Pionier-Bataillon Nr. 12, das 1. Train-Bataillon Nr. 12.  [Note: For each army corps there is a train battalion, in charge of the main supply train, and other duties. The pioneer corps carried all work connected with field engineering.]

http://www.lexikus.de/index.php?page=kapitel&thema=6&buch=849&kapitel=12557


1911

The Saxon army is modelled on that of Prussia. It forms the XII. and XIX. army corps in the imperial German army, with headquarters at Dresden and Leipzig respectively.

http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Saxony,_Germany


XII (1ST ROYAL SAXON) CORPS - REGULAR CORPS

On mobilization for World War I in August 1914, the XIX (2nd Royal Saxon) Army Corps (XIX. (2. Königlich Sächsisches) Armeekorps) again became the 2nd Infantry Division No. 24, although it was for convenience referred to outside of Saxony as the 24th Infantry Division or the 24th (2nd Royal Saxon) Infantry Division. The division was disbanded in 1919 during the demobilization of the German Army after World War I.

The 24th Division (24. Division), was also known as the 2nd Division No. 24 (2. Division Nr. 24)

During World War I, the division fought on the Western Front, seeing action in the Allied Great Retreat which culminated in the First Battle of the Marne, and then in the Race to the Sea. In 1916, it fought in the Battle of the Somme. In 1918, it participated in the German Spring Offensive, including the Second Battle of the Somme. Allied intelligence rated the division "very good" in 1917, but third class in 1918; however, its "conduct... was above average and would warrant a higher rating."[

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24th_Division_(German_Empire) ]

[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XII_(1st_Royal_Saxon)_Corps ]

Bischofswerda

SAXON ARMY CORPS X11

1st Royal Saxon Train Battalion No. 12

2nd Company

Train Battalions of the German empire in 1914

Regiment and Garrison Cuff Pattern & Color Straps Wappen
 
Kgl. Sächs. 1. Train-Bataillon Nr.12
(Dresden/Bischofswerda) XII Armee Korps
Black Sachsen (Saxon) Pattern Blue "Squared" Strap Piped in Red w/ Red 12 Gilt Sachsen Wappen on Gilt Star
Train Batl. Nr. 12 wore a light blue Waffenrock with black collar and cuffs piped in red.

[ http://www.kaisersbunker.com/gtp/New/train0.htm ]

1890

      

1910

http://www.grosser-generalstab.de/tafeln/knoe19/knoe20_03.html   http://www.deutschefotothek.de/obj30116082.html#|home

ROYAL SAXON 24TH RESERVE DIVISION

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/24th_Reserve_Division_(German_Empire) ]

ROYAL SAXON 23RD RESERVE DIVISION

123 INFANTRY DIVISION

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/123rd_Infantry_Division_(German_Empire) ]

PIONEER BATTALIONS

1 KS Pionier-Bataillon Nr. 12 Brückenbau Pirna ?? in Sammeln Seltenes , Ansichtskarten, Deutschland, Sachsen

[ http://cgi.ebay.at/1-K-S-Pionier-Bataillon-Nr-12-Bruckenbau-Pirna_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQitemZ260081338893 ]


ARMY GROUP

Germany: The German Army was organized into army groups (Heeresgruppen).


1921

Stammtruppenteile or Parent Units of the Reichsheer by Shawn Bohannon

The maintenance of military tradition was of great concern to many German military leaders following the end of World War I. As the German Army was drastically reduced to the 100,000-man Reichsheer, Generaloberst Hans von Seeckt, Chief of the Army Command, sought a means to perpetuate the traditions and heritage of the “old armies” (i.e., the pre-1918 imperial armies) at the regimental level. It was there the average soldier could find continuity between past and present and the esprit de corps that comes with belonging to a famous regiment with a long and distinguished history. In August 1921, von Seeckt ordered that certain companies of the Reichsheer regiments would maintain the lineage and honors of regiments in the old armies. Some companies and mounted squadrons were also granted the privilege of wearing accoutrements of the old regiments they represented. Seeckt also encouraged each company to collect memorabilia of their parent unit that would be displayed in regimental traditions rooms. The traditions companies would frequently invite veterans groups to regimental and company events, thus strengthening the bond between past and present ...


1918

GERMAN ARMY CORPS DISTRICTS

           

The German Forces in the Field, 6th Revision, April 1918 - http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924027944838


SAXON CONTROL